Paradelle* for Shattuck-St. Mary's

Parade fields knew the step and zest of youth.
Parade fields knew the step and zest of youth.
Gray eagles set them on a quest for truth.
Gray eagles set them on a quest for truth.
Youth eagles set zest on a gray fields quest.
For parade and step knew the truth of them.

After the war, fair ladies did appear.
After the war, fair ladies did appear.
And love replaced the regimen austere.
And love replaced the regimen austere.
The ladies replaced austere war, and after,
Did the fair love regimen appear.

Grammar and syntax laid quite aside,
Grammar and syntax laid quite aside,
Low sparrows in the aerie let it slide.
Low sparrows in the aerie let it slide.
Grammar aside, let slide in the aerie,
And syntax sparrows quite laid it low.

And ladies knew love syntax replaced
The fair grammar of the zest-quest set,
For sparrows laid austere eagles and the
Truth regimen low in the aerie and did
Slide-step them aside after quite a gray,
Youth parade let war fields appear on it.


* A Paradelle is a poem of four six-line stanzas in which the first and second lines, as well as the third and fourth lines of the first three stanzas, must be identical. The fifth and sixth lines, which traditionally resolve these stanzas, must use all the words from the preceding lines and only those words. Similarly, the final stanza must use every word from all the preceding stanzas and only these words. The form was invented by Billy Collins as a parody of strict poetic forms. My advice is don't try to write one.